evankart:

im-thirstyy:

shinnomew:

my-littletony:

vixen7:

I’m crying.

ITS BACK

"You’re the worst friend ever" in a monotone voice
I’m very happy

this video keeps me going

image “Bucky, r u sleeping?” “…” “Bucky, do you have-” “Shut up, I’ll kill you” “Bucky—”
Mewtwo: i see now that the circumstances of ones birth are irrelevant. it is what you do with the gift of life that determines who you are.
Mew: mew
googlyeyebooks:

"All our souls are written in our googly eyes."

googlyeyebooks:

"All our souls are written in our googly eyes."

nenilein:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Yep. Kawaii has a lot in common with punk when you think about it. Fun quirk in cultures.

nenilein:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Yep. Kawaii has a lot in common with punk when you think about it. Fun quirk in cultures.

dennys:

Just the locker that belongs to the coolest kid in school, no big.

dennys:

Just the locker that belongs to the coolest kid in school, no big.

crazyress:

voyeuristicdarlings:

spooxbert:

THAT SOUNDS LIKE A CHALLENGE

Please do not

dildon’t do that

crazyress:

voyeuristicdarlings:

spooxbert:

THAT SOUNDS LIKE A CHALLENGE

Please do not

dildon’t do that

imminentlyginger:

you fucked up

I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING IT HURTS

prettyplussize:

curvesgonewild.tumblr.comDress and Cardigan from Macy’s (:Headband from a gift shop in Sedona, AZOh yea, and Vans (:Much Peace and Love,Raay!

prettyplussize:

curvesgonewild.tumblr.com

Dress and Cardigan from Macy’s (:
Headband from a gift shop in Sedona, AZ
Oh yea, and Vans (:

Much Peace and Love,
Raay!

bisexuwhales:

I made a bisexual pride flag melted crayon art, just for fun and thought I’d share! :) (Sorry, it’s kinda horrible and a mess, bleh)
I make art for fun, so if anyone wants it for whatever reason, just message me. 

bisexuwhales:

I made a bisexual pride flag melted crayon art, just for fun and thought I’d share! :) (Sorry, it’s kinda horrible and a mess, bleh)

I make art for fun, so if anyone wants it for whatever reason, just message me. 

factsandchicks:

Singer Tom Waits successfully sued the LAPD. He was wrongfully arrested for disturbing the peace when, outside a coffee shop, he intervened a group of men who were bullying other patrons. The bullies were plainclothes officers.
source

factsandchicks:

Singer Tom Waits successfully sued the LAPD. He was wrongfully arrested for disturbing the peace when, outside a coffee shop, he intervened a group of men who were bullying other patrons. The bullies were plainclothes officers.

source

poetrymafia:

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.
In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 
African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

It seems that in the US, we’re still talking about Rwanda like it’s 1994.

poetrymafia:

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a “far-fetched feminist fantasy” – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in Rwanda.

In fact, women are making gains throughout Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 

African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

It seems that in the US, we’re still talking about Rwanda like it’s 1994.

prettycolors:

#3c012b

prettycolors:

#3c012b

comealongpixie:

"no homo," i say as i kiss my girlfriend. we are both bisexual.